Posted on 07 September, 2015

How The Brain Learns

By Jacob Andreae in Personal Development How The Brain Learns

[Photo credit: VaXzine]

Through our genetics and past experiences, we develop preferred ways for creating meaning of our world. The way we represent information in our brain, through our senses, shapes the way we make decisions, communicate and learn new things. As a teacher, salesperson or parent, you should know the four representational systems for creating meaning. Understanding them will help you communicate with others and leave them feeling like you really get them.

Watch the Video

Here's the direct link to this video, and stay up-to-date by subscribing to JacobTV.

In 2013, I completed a Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP) course. As part of the practitioner training, I learned about representational systems. Understanding the way people create meaning in their life, through their representational systems, has helped me immensely, to teach, coach and communicate with people at an advanced level.

Information is coming at us thick and fast. The way this information is filtered into our brains for internal representation can be classified into four systems. The preference for each system changes along a continuum. The comparison between the systems can also change, making representational systems as unique as the individual.

The Four Representational Systems Are:

Visual
People who have a preference for a visual representational system learn by SEEING pictures and are interested in how things LOOK. They are distracted by long verbal instructions and need to PICTURE things in order to help them store information.

Establish a visual preference by listening for words such as see, look and imagine.

When communicating with someone who has a visual representational system, provide them with IMAGES and confirm their understanding by asking, “How does that LOOK?”.

Auditory
People who have a preference for an auditory representational system learn by LISTENING and are interested in the way things SOUND. They are distracted by competing noise and need to REPEAT things back to help store information.

Establish an auditory preference by listening for words such as hear, listen and sound. 

When communicating with someone who has an auditory representational system, provide them with VERBAL instructions (pay attention to tone) and confirm their understanding by asking, “How does that SOUND?”

Kinaesthetic
People who have a preference for a kinaesthetic representational system learn by DOING things and are interested in how things FEEL. They are distracted by long verbal instructions and need to actually DO things in order to help store information.

Establish a kinaesthetic preference by listening for words such as feel, touch and hold.

When communicating with someone who has a kinaesthetic representational system, allow them to DO IT and confirm their understanding by asking, “How does that FEEL?” 

Auditory Digital
People who have a preference for an auditory digital representational system talk to themselves a lot and learn through STEPS and PROCEDURES. They also exhibit characteristics of other representational systems.

Establish an auditory digital preference by listening for words such as sense, experience and process.

When communicating with someone who has an auditory digital representational system, provide them with a SEQUENCE to follow and confirm their understanding by asking, “Do these STEPS make SENSE?

The way we make sense of our world is as unique as we are. In order to really understand others and communicate on their level, we must really listen to the words they use on a consistent basis. You can help people create meaning and understand, by communicating in the representational systems that they use most often.

What strategies do you use to communicate effectively with others? 

About Jacob Andreae

About Jacob Andreae

I write and speak about Fitness, Nutrition and Mindset. 

Subscribe to updates and get my eBook, Lose 10KGS, absolutely free!

How The Brain LearnsA quick start guide to losing weight and staying on track. Learn the strategies I use to eat and move for optimal health. Includes worksheets to enhance your motivation, commitment and discipline, along with a sample eating plan and exercise program.